Today's helmet tech reduces rotational-impact head injuries

Bicycle helmet technology to reduce traumatic brain injury (TBI)

We examine the latest in bicycle helmets – much improved protection than those of yesteryear, with designs and materials to handle the complex interactions and forces of a crash.

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Rocky Mountain recalls mountain bikes due to crash hazard

Rocky Mountain recalls mountain bikes due to crash hazard

Select models of Rocky Mountain's 2018 mountain bikes are being recalled because improperly secured brake housing presents a crash risk. Check to see if your bike is affected.

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MBUK January 2018 is out now

MBUK January 2018 is out now

With Christmas 2017 in the archives, visiting family members headed home and hopefully some shiny new bike bits, courtesy of Santa, it’s time to work off those mince pies with some two-wheeled fun in the hills. For this month’s mag we’ve travelled far and wide, from the Arctic reaches of Norway, to the mountains of the French / Swiss Alps and the dusty forests of California to bring you an exciting mix of mountain biking tales. In Norway, we journey by boat to explore a wilderness of almost untapped trail riding potential in the Arctic fjords. In the Alps, we speak to three influential trail builders who are shaping both bike parks and the way we ride. And in California, we follow downhill and enduro racing legend Tracy Moseley as she tackles the iconic two-day Downieville Classic race. Closer to home we’ve been across the border into Scotland to check ...

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Opinion: Do we really need 29-inch DH bikes?

Greg Minnaar on his way to victory aboard his 29 inch Santa Cruz V-10

29er downhill bikes are beginning to top podiums in World Cup DH races. BikeRoar ponders if 29in DH bikes are necessary and considers benefits and disadvantages of going big wheeled.

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Eat, Drink and be Merry: 5 tips to success at a 24 hour race

When 24 hour racing - eat, drink, and be merry

It is a tough discipline, but there are ways through the haze and fog of pain and exhaustion when you set out to tackle a 24 hour race. Here's how.

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November's MBUK is out now!

November's MBUK is out now!

The year may only just be drawing to a close but we’ve been thinking about 2018’s bikes for quite a while now. During the various launches and trade shows that happen throughout the year, our test team have gradually been putting together a picture of where we think we’re heading in 2018 and what’s happening to the bikes we ride. So we’ve carefully selected six very different bikes that we think best represent these new trends and the different styles of riding that you as mountain bikers are into. Discover our choices and find out how each bike fared on page 96. They’re not the only bikes we’ve swung a leg over this month though and we’ve got First Ride reviews on Cotic’s revised BFe hardtail, Bird Cycleworks’ Aeris 145 and more. In the grouptest we’ve subjected 14 trail and heavy-hitting knee pads to some crash testing and there are ...

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Burgtec Penthouse MK4 pedal review

Burgtec Penthouse MK4 pedal review

Burgtec aims its components squarely at DH riders, but much of it works well for aggro trail use too — like these Penthouse pedals. Best mountain bike pedals — 8 we rate How to get pinned on flat pedals Burly aluminum bodies sit on steel axles and weigh in at 452g per pair. Lighter, titanium axled versions are also available for an extra 50 quid and are 70g more svelte than the pedals tested here. The Penthouses have mid-sized platforms at 97x100mm so there was virtually no exposed pedal beneath my size 9 shoes. At 16mm deep, the pedals are reasonable thin, though the leading edges are stepped rather than chamfered and strikes have dinged them up a fair bit during testing. The 452g Penthouse MK4 pedals feel reassuringly stiff and provide a super solid platform underfoot. A short axle means they sit very close to the cranks and while ...

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Shimano XT M8000 groupset review

Shimano XT M8000 groupset review

Deore XT may be Shimano’s second-tier mountain bike group, but it’s the one most mountain biker’s look to when they want to balance price with performance. The XT line covers a wide range of users, from cross-country riders to enduro racers and everyone in between. As a result, the M8000 group is the Japanese brand’s most versatile component group to date. Shimano XT Di2 M8050 1x11 review Buyer's guide to mountain bike groupsets For many riders, the most anticipated addition to M8000 group was the adoption of wide-range cassettes and front chainrings in whatever flavor you prefer. Whether you’re relying on cables or wires, Shimano still reigns supreme when it comes to shift performance This 11-speed transmission is offered with 11-40t and 11-42t cassettes to be used with double and triple cranksets. (Yes, retro-grouches can still have their triples.) The latest XT group was Shimano’s first step into the realm ...

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Women's bike sizes: a simple guide

Women's bike sizes: a simple guide

What size bike should I buy? It's a common question that women have when considering a new bike. That's why we've created a simple women's frame sizing guide on BikeRadar , which is divided into tables for road bikes, mountain bikes and hybrid bikes. Best women's bikes: a buyer's guide to help you find what you need Presenting the BikeRadar Women's Bike of the Year Awards Women's cycling news, reviews, interviews and more on BikeRadar Women Choosing the correct frame size can be confusing, especially since recommended frame sizes vary between manufacturers, models and disciplines. What size bike do I need? As a general starting point, bike sizes are determined by the height of the rider. Use this to decide what size to try using our charts below. If you sit between sizes, it’s worth trying both out and seeing which one fits you better. Most bike manufacturers will also ...

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Best mountain bike: how to choose the right one for you

Best mountain bike: how to choose the right one for you

Picking out the best mountain bike can seem like a complicated business. The sheer variety of bike types, not to mention the bewildering array of technology and terminology surrounding them, can seem staggering. Best mountain bikes under £500 Best mountain bikes under £1,000 Best mountain bikes under £1,500 Best mountain bikes under £3,000 Our buying guide will run you through everything you need to know, from how much you should spend to what kind of mountain bike will be best for you. We'll also highlight the key features you should look out for and then point you to our lists of the best buys at each price point. The path to choosing your ideal ride can seem as root-infested as any trail — let us be your guide… How much do I need to spend? For most people — and especially when starting out — budget is the critical factor ...

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SRAM Guide RSC brake review

SRAM Guide RSC brake review

Any of SRAM’s Guide brakes are hard to beat for excellent on-trail performance and an easy servicing life, but the Guide RSCs are just plain awesome if you can afford them. Disc Brake Systems reviews Best mountain bikes under £1,000 The major performance gain over the Guide RS brakes are the super-smooth cartridge lever pivots. This gives them an ultra-sensitive feel for boosting already excellent modulation to a level of stiction-free HD clarity that’s definitely noticeable if you’re swapping back and forth between the two different brakes. The RSC levers also get subtle but usefully effective bite point adjustment via a simple toothed adjustment wheel buried in the body. There’s not a massive difference between the two extremes, but Guide brakes rarely differ much in feel between levers, so it’s ample for balancing feel between left and right or tuning in your exact preferred bite point. They're simply among the ...

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SRAM Guide RE brake review

SRAM Guide RE brake review

SRAM’s ‘new’ Guide RE is officially designed for stopping the extra mass of electric bikes that regularly burn out conventional brakes. The good news is that also makes it an outstanding brake for anyone who needs a ton of power and control without spending a fortune. SRAM Code brake first ride review How to brake like a pro Mountain bike groupsets: everything you need to know We say ‘new’ because while it’s only just appeared on the SRAM roster, the Guide RE is a hybrid of two well established brakes. At the bar end is a standard Guide R lever, while the bike end is a four-cylinder brake caliper from SRAM ’s long-running Code downhill brake. The same pairing has also previously appeared on Specialized DH bikes and SRAM has been offering a similar XC meets DH hybrid in the shape of the Code R brake for years. The Guide ...

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The best upgrades for your mountain bike

The best upgrades for your mountain bike

The best advice we’ve ever heard given about dream machines is disarmingly simple: the best bike in the world is the bike you already have. That’s because regardless of how it compares to the latest carbon wonder bike that is being worshipped on the web, it’s the bike you can actually go out and ride whenever you want. Best cheap mountain bike upgrades Mountain bike groupsets: everything you need to know However, that’s never going to stop most of us wondering how we can improve our ride and hopefully amp up our ability and enjoyment in the process. That’s why our encyclopedically minded test team have pooled all their experience to help you create the ultimate upgrade plan for your current mountain bike, whatever you’ve got to spend and however you want it to ride. The most important thing to realise is that a clear plan will give much better ...

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A guide to mountain bike axle standards

A guide to mountain bike axle standards

Are you baffled by the different axle options available for mountain bikes? Our guide below explains the different types. Complete guide to bottom brackets Best dropper posts: buyer's guide and recommendations 1. Quick-release skewers Traditionally, frames and forks had slotted dropouts. The hub axle, which was 9mm in diameter and 100mm (front) or 135mm (rear) wide, rested in these. A thin (5mm diameter) QR skewer was then slid through the hollow axle to clamp everything in place. Not as stiff or secure as so-called ‘thru-axle’ systems, QRs are now mostly found on cheaper bikes. 2. Rear thru-axles Thru-axles are also inserted through a hollow hub axle, but they’re bigger (rear ones are 12mm in diameter) and screw into closed dropouts. 3. Front thru-axles 4. Boost thru-axles You can read more at BikeRadar.com

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Best women's bike saddle: a buyer's guide

Best women's bike saddle: a buyer's guide

A good saddle that fits you and is comfortable is a hugely important element to the bike comfort equation. The wrong saddle is a special type of torture that can cause pain and discomfort. The right saddle, however, is the one you barely notice when you're riding because it's doing its job properly. For many women, a women's specific saddle is the answer and there are women's saddles available for road cycling, mountain biking, leisure riding and everything in between. Best women's bikes: a buyer's guide to help you find what you need Six of the best women’s mountain bike saddles Women's saddles are generally a different shape to men's to take into account the physiological differences between men and women; hip width and different genitalia are of course two of the major considerations. Saddles designed for women take into account these anatomical elements and products are developed around how ...

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Best enduro bike: 9 we recommend

Best enduro bike: 9 we recommend

If you’re looking for a bike that can take on the toughest descents but still let you get up the climbs under your own steam, then an enduro bike might be just what you need. Read on for all the things you need to know about them, plus our pick of the best enduro bikes on the market. Beginner's guide to enduro racing Best mountain bike: how to choose the right one for you Enduro bikes are one of the hottest products in mountain biking at the moment. The name 'enduro' refers to a rally-style race format where downhill stages are timed, but the linking stages that join the descents up aren’t. The descents themselves can vary from fairly pedally to extremely steep and technical. Originally, most of the competitors just used normal trail bikes, but as the popularity of the sport has grown, more specialist bikes have been developed. ...

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